All You Need to Know About the Spanish Inquisition

The Spanish Inquisition, formally initiated on 1st November 1478 by the government of Spain, was a legal and social movement between 1478 and 1834 that targeted non-Catholics, including Muslims, Jews, Protestants, religious reformers, and others who refused to convert to Catholicism. The Inquisition resulted in the execution of thousands of heretics and the disappearance of many more victims; historians estimate that between 40,000 and 200,000 people were charged with crimes before 1834.

The history of wine stretches back thousands of years, with the earliest known evidence of wine production dating back to 6,000 BCE in Georgia and 4,000 BCE in Iran. But how did the Spanish Inquisition come to have such an impact on the history of wine? Let’s take a look at this fascinating piece of history and see what forced this connection between the Inquisition and wine.

The Spanish Inquisition

Thousands were signed at the stake under the Torquemada, the most infamous inquisitors. Moreover, several thousand were killed as a result of the ejection of Moriscos (Spanish Muslims who were baptized as Christians) which started in 1609. 

Whenever the Inquisition initially accused someone of a crime, inquisitors commonly would offer light sentences or punishments to individuals who were able to concede their own inclusion in blasphemy. Those admissions were utilized to distinguish other blasphemers, who were brought before a court Those charged were regularly not informed about the charges brought against them, and admissions were frequently obtained through pressure, seizure of property, or torment.

Assuming the accused were observed guilty, the sentence would be reported in a very public scene. The denounced would then be given over to the civil authorities to carry out the sentence. It was on the 14th of March, 1473, when anti-Semitic riots started for three days against conversos. Conversos refer to the Jews who had converted to Christianity. 

The Spanish sovereign official Maria Cristina de Borbon eventually announced the cessation of the Spanish Inquisition on 15 July 1834. 

Was the Spanish Inquisition expected? Pope Lucius III proclaimed the primary investigation in 1184, almost 300 years before the making of the Spanish Inquisition, and the utilization of torment was approved for inquisitors in 1252. As a result, numerous Jews proclaimed their change to Christianity in order to escape oppression.

However, they remained the objects of disdain and contempt. Spanish authorities in Córdoba never really interceded during the three days of complete anti-converso crowd savagery in 1473. It was on the 1st of November 1478 when the Spanish Inquisition was created.

Reconquista

Reconquista refers to a long series of fights by the Christian states to oust the Muslims, also known as Moors, who had been ruling most of the Iberian Peninsula since the 8th century. Visigoths had controlled Spain for quite a long time before they were invaded by the Umayyad domain. 

When we talk about Reconquista, some consider it a religious crusade whereas some call it a political expansion. Well, the Reconquista started not as a religious crusade, yet rather as an issue of political development or expansion. By the 11th century, the pope upheld a portion of the missions against the Muslims.

The Templar and Hospitaller knights battled in Spain. Talking about the 2nd Crusade, focused on Iberia. Nonetheless, the Reconquista was not unequivocally religious. On the 29th of October, 1484, Tomás de Torquemada called an assembly in order to standardize the Spanish Inquisition.

Wine-Making Process After the Reconquista

The joint military powers of Aragon and Castile defeated the Muslims in Granada in 1492 under the leadership of King Ferdinand in the southern part of Spain after more than 700 years of Reconquista.

A couple of months after the Reconquista, America was inadvertently found by adventurer Christopher Columbus with the support of the Spanish Crown while searching for an elective course to the Kingdoms of India.

Following the Reconquista, a new era of exporting Bilbao and Spanish wine began. Spanish wines were sent to English wine markets in Southampton, London, and Bristol markets. The wines, which were full-bodied with higher liquor, were likewise regularly utilized for mixing with delicate wines from cooler environments like Germany and France.

The discovery of America additionally opened up another commodity market as well as a new open door for wine creation.

 Spanish conquistadors and missionaries introduced European grape plants to the grounds they colonized. Gradually, these new regions turned into a danger to Spanish wine income. As a result, Philip III and his succeeding rulers publicized announcements and assertions that ordered the stopping of wine creation in the New World Colonies. These orders were to a great extent overlooked, however, in certain settlements it dialed back the development and advancement of grape plantations.

Jamon Pairing with Wine

Rumors have spread far and wide suggesting that Spanish bartenders used to lay Jamon slices over the edges of wine glasses in order to safeguard the drink from unwanted dust and bugs. This was called ‘Tapa’. Gradually, this idea developed into a cross-country custom of matching little nibbles of cured meats and cheeses with the local wines of Spain.

Today, Jamon might be best enjoyed when joined by decent bread and decent wine. Numerous dry white wines and red wines pair well. However, the best pairing may be crisp manzanilla or dry fino sherry. 

On This Day

1st November 1478- On this day, the Spanish Inquisition officially began. It was a legal and social movement between 1478 and 1834 initiated by the government of Spain that targeted non-Catholics, including Muslims, Jews, Protestants, religious reformers, and others who refused to convert to Catholicism.

15th July 1834- On this day, the Spanish Inquisition came to an end. The Spanish sovereign official Maria Cristina de Borbon announced the cessation of the Spanish Inquisition.

14th March 1473- On this day, three-day anti-Semitic riots started against conversos. Conversos refers to the Jews who had converted to Christianity. 

29th October 1484- On this day, Tomás de Torquemada called an assembly in order to standardize the Spanish Inquisition.

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References

  1. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spanish_Inquisition
  2. https://www.britannica.com/topic/Spanish-Inquisition
  3. https://www.britannica.com/summary/Spanish-Inquisition-Timeline
  4. https://www.britannica.com/summary/Spanish-Inquisition-Timeline

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